Front Fence Height Regulations In NSW

Front Fence Height Regulations In NSW

Front Fence Height Regulations NSW

The front fence height regulations in NSW outline the guidelines for the permissible height of fences in the region. These regulations specify the maximum height allowed for front fences on residential properties, ensuring compliance with local building codes and maintaining aesthetic harmony within the neighborhood.

Are you thinking of building a new fence around your property in NSW? You must consider several laws before you start, such as front fence height restrictions. Find out more about residential fencing regulations in NSW, what you must know before you build and how to make sure you comply with your state’s legislation. Let’s take a closer look.

Fencing Laws In NSW

People may wish to erect a fence on their property for several reasons, whether for security, privacy, or to keep their pets and children safe. Australian fencing requirements focus on safety, the environment and maintaining good neighbourly relations.

A new residential fence must meet NSW fencing requirements, and you will also need to understand your local council rules and guidelines.

These are some of the most important rules to follow when erecting a new fence in New South Wales:

  • Gates must open inwards
  • Non-combustible materials or hardwood fencing is required in bushfire areas
  • Metal must be low reflective and pre-coloured
  • Electrical or barbed wire fencing is not permitted in residential areas
  • Fences in a protected fauna area may require additional local council restrictions
  • Before removing vegetation, check with the local council to ensure they are not protected species
  • Fencing must be constructed as per the Building code of Australia
  • Consult your neighbour before building a dividing fence and understand your responsibilities
  • Side and rear boundary fences must not exceed 1.8 metres.
  • Fences along a secondary or primary road must not exceed 1.2 metres
  • Fences on the boundary of a secondary road must be 20% transparent and have no solid piers or posts wider than 350mm.

Different legislations manage the rules and standards in each state. In the Australian Capital Territory, for example, the Common Boundaries Act states that some small fences are exempt from building approvals.

In NSW, being familiar with the Dividing Fences Act 1991 can help you understand your rights in the case of a dispute over a proposed fence. Shared dividing fences can be a common cause of neighbourly disputes.

Australian Fencing Standards

State governments regulate the maintenance and building of dividing fences throughout Australia. Australian fencing standards vary, and several factors need to be considered, such as the age of your structure. In NSW, for example, heritage protection laws restrict the building materials and fence style used when fencing around old structures.

When building a new fence, you must abide by the rules and ensure that it meets Australian fencing standards.

Depending on the type of structure, different rules may apply, with a focus on safety. For example, pool fencing has restrictions established to help keep children safe from drowning, a boundary fence can protect a child or pet from traffic, and electric fencing has regulations for safe installation and construction.

In NSW, neighbours sharing fencing must contribute equally to the construction costs. Ideally, once an agreement is reached, it should be documented to avoid future disputes. The contract should cover:

  • Height
  • Type of material
  • Cost
  • Colour
  • Position
  • Removal of the existing structure
  • Property boundary lines
  • Additional preparation work

What Are Zoning Rules?

Before erecting a fence on your property, you must be aware of the rules and regulations regarding residential fencing in your area.

Every property in Australia must abide by planning policies and environmental controls within its zone. The zoning rules vary depending on which council is responsible for your area. The rules consider safety, the environment and maintaining good relations with your neighbour. Before building a new fence, you should find out whether you need to obtain council approval.

Why Install A Fence?

You can install a fence around your property for several reasons:

  • Fences can add a level of privacy, mainly if you are located on a busy road
  • Dividing fences can help keep your pet confined within your property
  • Fences can offer an extra level of security, which makes access to your home more difficult for would-be thieves or home invaders
  • A dividing fence can be an ideal way to define the boundaries of your property, which makes garden maintenance easier in suburban locations

Types Of Fences

There are several types of fence materials available. Costs, difficulty and overall appearance can vary.

Some of the most popular include:

  • Timber
  • Colorbond
  • Iron
  • Metal or chain
  • PVC
  • Brush

Fence Height Regulations

Each state and territory has a different rule regarding the height of garden fences. In Northern Territory, for example, there is no requirement to have a fence around residential property. In some states, like Tasmania, you must obtain a planning permit for rear and side fences. In Western Australia, building approval is only required for brick and masonry fences.

Retaining walls and brush fences have specific criteria. You should check your state’s fencing rules for more details.

If you share a dividing fence with a neighbour, you should work together to ensure that you are both happy with the decisions made.

Alternatives To Extending The Height Of Your Fence

The most obvious solution to extending the height of your fence whilst still complying with the height requirements is to add a living extension. Adding a hedge, bush or tall growing plant can provide privacy and soundproofing. A trellis with thick climbing vines can be an attractive addition, with the benefit of bringing pollinating bees and insects to your garden. It should not exceed 2 metres.

Alternatively, a greenhouse or small shed can be built along the boundary fence. It can be up to 2.5 metres and does not require a building permit.

Summary

People may wish to erect a fence on their property for several reasons, whether for security, privacy, or to keep their pets and children safe. Before erecting a fence, you must be aware of the local council rules and regulations regarding residential fencing in your area. Australian standards regulate details such as height regulations and permitted fencing materials that can be used, and depending on the type of fence; different rules may apply.

Each state and territory has a different rule regarding the height of a garden fence. In New South Wales, for example, residential fences should not exceed 1.8 metres. Further restrictions apply if the fence is located along a primary or secondary road.

Different legislations manage the rules and standards in each state. Shared dividing fences can be a common cause of neighbourly disputes, so you should be aware of your state’s fencing laws.

FAQs

1. How High Can Your Front Fence Be?

Answer: Rules about residential fence heights are governed by state legislation. Australian fencing standards vary, and height restrictions differ from state to state.

The average fence in Australia is between 1.8 and 1.2 metres in height.

Adding a hedge, bush or tall growing plant can add privacy, soundproofing and extend the height of your fencing. A trellis with thick climbing vines can be an attractive addition to your fence structure, with the benefit of bringing pollinating bees and insects to your garden. Your living structure should not exceed 2 metres.

2. Can I Put A Fence Around My Front Yard?

Answer: Before you can build a fence on your property, you must be aware of the local council rules and restrictions regarding residential fencing in your area. Each state and territory has different rules regarding the height of a garden fence. In Tasmania, for example, you may need to obtain a planning permit. In residential zones, restrictions are placed on the type of material used. For instance, metal fences must be low reflective and pre-coloured, and you must use certain fencing materials when building in bushfire zones.

If you share a dividing fence with a neighbour, you should work together to ensure that you are both happy with the decisions made.

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